DATA VISUALISATION AND VISUAL DESIGN FOR INFORMATION EXTRACTION IN TRADITIONAL PRINT PUBLICATION AND DIGITAL CULTURE

Authors

  • STEPHEN T. F. POON School of Media, Arts & Design, Asia Pacific University of Technology & Innovation, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Keywords:

information extraction, publication, visual design, visual literacy, visualisation

Abstract

The subject of this study is on information design and data visualisation. The aim of research is to understand perspectives of visual design in improving critical visual literacy. The objective of study is to identify various perspectives towards critical visual literacy among audiences who have access to print publications, but who are increasingly migrating to digital media platforms. In the overview of literature, this paper will be reviewing a wide range of scholarly works from authors who have effectively identified the role of data visualisation in audiences’ use of print and digital media to extract information. A mixed-methods approach is utilised for research methodology. The first method is a case study of a century-old natural science publication. German biologist Ernst Haeckel’s 1904 double volume of lithographic prints, Art Forms in Nature, will be critically discussed. The second method presents the results of a survey of Malaysian audiences’ attitudes and perceptions towards visual information, and the key factors that foster and hinder information extraction and medium use, specifically aspects of convenience and layout design. Respondents were also queried on the functionality and importance of digital media for the purpose of knowledge, research and information gathering. Analysis of survey findings show that there is still a limited scope of understanding audiences’ challenges with both lexical (reading) and visual literacies. This dilemma is essential for visual designers to acknowledge, in the context of mapping the functions of data visualisation for designing information in publications. Among commercial publishers, particularly those in digital publication sectors, the current impact of digital visual culture on traditional print publication suggests that this dilemma must be further studied to understand future implications of data visualisation and visual design on audiences seeking knowledge and information. Some recommendations will be provided.

References

Amirshahi, S.A., Hayn-Leichsenring, G.U., Denzler, J., Redies, C. (2014): Evaluating the rule of thirds in photographs and paintings. – Art & Perception 2(1-2): 163-182.

Ball, P. (2007): Painting the whole picture? – Nature 445(7127): 486-487.

Berkeley Official Portal (2021): Ernst Haeckel (1834-1919). – Berkerley: University of California, Museum of Paleontology. Available on:

https://ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/haeckel.html

Berkeley Library Official Portal (2020): Data Visualisation: Design Considerations. – Berkeley: University of California. Available on:

https://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/data-visualization/design

Boyne, R. (2001): Subject, Society and Culture. – SAGE Publications, London 192p.

Breidbach, O. (2005): Visions of Nature: The Art and Science of Ernst Haeckel. – Prestel Verlag 299p.

Cairo, A. (2013): The Functional Art: An Introduction to Information Graphics and Visualisation. – New Riders Press 384p.

Carus, P. (1914): God-Nature: A Discussion of Haeckel's Religion. – Open Court 28: 385-404.

Creately official Portal (2021): 5 Amazing Advantages of Visual Communication You Can’t Ignore. – Creately Official Portal. Available on:

https://creately.com/blog/diagrams/visual-communication-benefits

Cresswell, J.W. (2016): Educational Research: Planning, Conducting and Evaluating Quantitative and Qualitative Research. – Prentice Hall 671p.

Crossick, G., Kaszynska, P. (2016): Understanding the value of arts & culture. – Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 204p.

Debes, J.L. (1969): Visual literacy defined. – International Visual Literacy Association (IVLA). Available on:

https://ivla.org/about-us/visual-literacy-defined

Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) (2014): Graphic design for researcher. – Institute of Education Sciences, US Department of Education 5p.

Gontar, C. (2006): Art Nouveau. – The Metropolitan Museum of Art Official Portal. Available on:

https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/artn/hd_artn.htm

Griffin, M. (2008): Visual competence and media literacy: can one exist without the other? – Visual Studies 23(2): 113-129.

Haeckel, E. (1974): Art Forms in Nature. – Dover Publications, New York 100p.

Haeckel, E. (1899): Art Forms in Nature/Kunst-Formen der Natur: 100 Plates. – Leipzig und Wien: Verlag des Bibliographischen Instituts. Available on:

https://archive.org/details/KunstformenDerNaturErnstHaeckel

Herman, J. (2011): Off the shelf: Art forms in nature. – The New York Times Style Magazines. Available on:

https://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/08/23/off-the-shelf-art-forms-in-nature

Howells, R. (2009): Using Visual Evidence. – Open University Press 216p.

Irmscher, C. (2018): The Art and Science of Ernst Haeckel’ Review: The Zoologist as Artist. – The Wall Street Journal. Available on:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-art-and-science-of-ernst-haeckel-review-the-zoologist-as-artist-1523655263

Lexico Official Portal (2021): Definition of Visual. – Oxford Lexico Official Portal. Available on:

https://www.lexico.com/definition/visual

Lutz, A., Gerber, A. (2006): Influences: A Lexicon of Contemporary Graphic Design Practice. – Die Gestalten Verlag GmbH & Co, Berlin, Germany 9p.

Moere, A.V., Purchase, H. (2011): On the role of design in information visualization. – Information Visualization 10(4): 356-371.

Nation, K. (2017): Nurturing a lexical legacy: Reading experience is critical for the development of word reading skill. – NPJ Science of Learning 2(1): 1-4.

Newfield, D. (2011): From visual literacy to critical visual literacy: An analysis of educational materials. – English Teaching: Practice and Critique 10(1): 81-94.

Pacey, P. (1983): Information technology and the universal availability of images. – IFLA Journal 9(3): 230-235.

Poynor, R. (2006): Designing Pornotopia: Travels in Visual Culture. – Princeton Architectural Press 208p.

Poynor, R. (2004): How to Say What You Mean. – Design Observer Official Portal. Available on:

https://designobserver.com/feature/how-to-say-what-you-mean/2097

Poynor, R. (2003): No More Rules: Graphic Design and Postmodernism. – Yale University Press 192p.

Reddy, K.S., Agrawal, R. (2012): Designing case studies from secondary sources: A conceptual framework. – International Management Review 8(2): 63-70.

Reime, T. (2015): Memes as Visual Tools for Precise Message Conveying. – Norwegian University of Science and Technology 12p.

Robinson, G. (2021): Ernst Haeckel. – Britannica Official Portal. Available on:

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Ernst-Haeckel

Rose, G. (2016): Visual Methodologies: An Introduction to Researching with Visual Materials. – SAGE Publications, London 456p.

Staniszewski, M.A. (1995): Believing is Seeing: Creating the Culture of Art. – Penguin Books, New York 320p.

Sturken, M., Cartwright, L. (2001): Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture. – Oxford University Press 385p.

Taggart, E. (2019): Before Macro Photography, This Scientist Used to Illustrate His Microscopic Findings. – My Modern Met Official Portal. Available on:

https://mymodernmet.com/ernst-haeckel-art/

Welsh, T.S., Wright, M.S. (2010): Information Literacy in the Digital Age: An Evidence-Based Approach. – Oxford: Chandos Publishing 236p.

Downloads

Published

2021-11-18

How to Cite

POON, S. T. F. (2021). DATA VISUALISATION AND VISUAL DESIGN FOR INFORMATION EXTRACTION IN TRADITIONAL PRINT PUBLICATION AND DIGITAL CULTURE. Quantum Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities, 2(6), 73–88. Retrieved from https://qjssh.com/index.php/qjssh/article/view/108

Issue

Section

Articles